See—and Save—the Endangered Rhino

Peter Davis Krahenbuhl September 7, 2015 0

In our last article on where to “See—and Save—the World’s Most Endangered Species: Part 1” we took a look at the endangered Siberian and Bengal tigers. Another incredib(ly endangered) animal is the rhinoceros. One of the world’s few remaining emblems of a bygone pre-historic era, the rhino once ruled many parts of Eurasia and Africa. Now they thrive only in wildlife sanctuaries and national parks.

In fact, two species in Asia—the Javan and Sumatran rhinos—are critically endangered. There are only an estimated 57 of these incredible creatures left in Java, Indonesia, and as a result a full-court press effort is well underway to see if these special animals can be brought back from the brink of extinction. To see some of the best images ever captured of one of the world’s rarest and most endangered mammals, the elusive Javan rhino, visit World Wildlife Fund (WWF) to see photographer Stephen Belcher’s work in Indonesia’s Ujung Kulon National Park.

Image credit: Natural Habitat Adventures

Image credit: Natural Habitat Adventures

Fairing slightly better is the giant one-horned Rhino in Bhutan and Nepal, and in Africa the white and black Rhinos cling to conservation efforts. While rampant rhino poaching is a significant issue in South Africa (fueled by demand in Asia), efforts are underway to relocate individuals across the border to remote Botswana, where security measures to are very strong in protecting the country’s amazing wildlife. You can also experience other amazing wildlife on a Botswana African Safari, including leopards, elephants and lions, to name a few.

In Namibia, the endangered black rhino depends vitally on conservation efforts supported by responsible tourism activity that provides both economic incentives to protect the species, while sending a strong message to government. As a result it seems to be on the comeback, with numbers doubling to around 5,000 over the last 20 years from their low point. This, however, is nothing to brag about as at the turn of the last century they roamed the continent in numbers that were closer to 100,000).

Tracking Rhinos in the Namibian Desert: A Diary offers a great personal story of tracking and learning more about conservation efforts to save the endangered black rhino, including work done by WWF and Save the Rhino Trust in the Damaraland region of Namibia.

© Andy Austin / WWF-US

© Andy Austin / WWF-US

See—and save—endangered rhinos on an Asian or African safari with Nat Hab and WWF.

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