Climate Change »

Sea Ice: Losing in the Arctic, but Gaining in the Antarctic

Sea Ice: Losing in the Arctic, but Gaining in the Antarctic

Candice Gaukel Andrews May 8, 2012 7

Cute, adorable animals are often used to garner support for environmental causes in places that are remote. After all, it’s hard to have concern for an area that is at the opposite end of

Read More »
More Penguins—and People—in Antarctica than Previously Thought

More Penguins—and People—in Antarctica than Previously Thought

Candice Gaukel Andrews April 24, 2012 5

There are twice as many emperor penguins in Antarctica than previously thought, stated the National Science Foundation in mid April. That’s certainly good news, as concerns about the effects of global warming on penguin

Read More »
Yellowstone National Park: Global Warming’s Version of CliffsNotes

Yellowstone National Park: Global Warming’s Version of CliffsNotes

Candice Gaukel Andrews April 17, 2012 17

With piles of popular articles on the subject and decades of research behind us, you’d think we’d all be experts on global warming by now, right? But it turns out that half of the

Read More »
The Incredible, Shrinking Wild World and Why Size Matters

The Incredible, Shrinking Wild World and Why Size Matters

Candice Gaukel Andrews March 6, 2012 9

Animals and plants are shrinking, and most scientists believe that global warming is the cause. Recently, researchers examined 85 species and found that 45 percent of them have been steadily decreasing in size from

Read More »
Earth Hour, March 31, 2012: Give 60 Minutes for the Planet

Earth Hour, March 31, 2012: Give 60 Minutes for the Planet

Candice Gaukel Andrews February 21, 2012 11

It’s as simple as turning off your lights for one hour on Saturday, March 31, at 8:30 p.m., your local time. That’s it. It may be the easiest thing you’ll ever be asked to

Read More »
Room for Wolverines to Roam

Room for Wolverines to Roam

Candice Gaukel Andrews February 16, 2012 8

Although they resemble small bears, wolverines actually belong to the weasel family. These solitary animals primarily live in the remote reaches of northern boreal forests, in the sub-Arctic tundra of northern Canada, on the

Read More »