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The Stickiness of Learning Outdoors

The Stickiness of Learning Outdoors

Candice Gaukel Andrews February 12, 2019 1

Today, the average American child is by far an indoor creature, spending only four to seven minutes a day in unstructured play outdoors and more than seven hours a day in front of a

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Grasslands: A Lot More Than Just Flyover Country

Grasslands: A Lot More Than Just Flyover Country

Candice Gaukel Andrews February 5, 2019 1

Across the world, they go by many names: downs, prairies, pampas, rangelands, steppes, savannas or velds. But what all of these landscapes have in common is that grass is their naturally dominant vegetation. These “grasslands” occupy what I

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Wilderness: Lost and Found

Wilderness: Lost and Found

Candice Gaukel Andrews January 29, 2019 5

Today, little more than 20 percent of the world can still be considered “wilderness.” That’s not a lot, especially when you weigh the benefits that those few designated areas provide. In the last two

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Traveling Small in the Big Outdoors

Traveling Small in the Big Outdoors

Candice Gaukel Andrews January 22, 2019 3

Being an inveterate introvert, I avoid large crowds—well, really, even groups of people numbering 15 or more—like the plague. Yet the places that call to me are some of the most jam-packed because they

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The Year-Round Land of Evergreens: the Taiga

The Year-Round Land of Evergreens: the Taiga

Candice Gaukel Andrews January 15, 2019 3

It’s mid-January, the time some people call the “doldrums,” a period of feeling low energy and a lack of motivation after the Christmas and New Year season of celebration and parties. It can be

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More than Travel Guides, Maps Tell Nature’s Stories

More than Travel Guides, Maps Tell Nature’s Stories

Candice Gaukel Andrews January 8, 2019 1

Maps are far more than sets of instructions on how to get from Point A to Point B. They tell stories. And whether they’re digital or paper maps, the tales they spin range from

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