Outside Magazine Lauds Natural Habitat’s Antarctica Kayak Expedition

Wendy Redal March 9, 2011 0

Natural Habitat Expeditions is once again on Outside magazine’s Top Trips list — this time with our 2012 Antarctica sea kayaking trip, listed as one of Outside‘s “23 Reasons to Get Out There” in the March 2011 issue.

This lightweight, tracking sticker is carried on the delicate wings of a monarch. ©John T. Andrews

Here’s what they have to say about our ambitious little adventure:

“Natural Habitat Adventures leads a ballsy month-long sea-kayaking trip for expert paddlers. The trip, based off the 54-foot S/V Northanger expedition ship, leaves from Ushuaia, Argentina, and crosses the Drake’s Passage. Then it’s two weeks of paddling (8 to 14 miles per day) and chilly camping. From $ 14,500, February 22 – March 21 2012.”

There’s ‘adventure travel’ — and then there is Real Adventure Travel, Nat Hab-style.

Nat Hab’s CEO (that’s Chief Exploratory Officer) Olaf Malver pioneered the first-ever successful commercial sea kayaking trip to the South Georgia Archipelago and the Palmer Peninsula on the Antarctic Continent in 1998 with a small group of select paddlers and adventure-travel journalists.

kayak_antarctica-300x191“We learned two things from this amazing adventure,” says Olaf. “First, the Antarctic waters are some of the most spectacular seas on the planet, and despite their frigid conditions, replete with a stunning complement of wildlife. Secondly, these polar waters are best encountered from the seat of a kayak – there is simply no better means of experiencing their beauty and abundance up close.”

Since then, Nat Hab has worked to perfect this true trip-of-a-lifetime. The specific destination for the 2012 expedition is the Gerlache Strait/Lemaire Channel region on the west side of the Palmer Peninsula at approximately 65 degrees south. Here’s a brief description from our website: “Here, high, ice-robed mountains tower over deep fjords as massive icebergs drift in an endless flotilla across the waters. These channels are relatively protected from the wilder waves of the ‘Screaming Sixties,’ and we can expect to find some of the best kayaking conditions in the Antarctic.”

If you’ve got the guts, you’re sure to find the glory.

Yours in Adventure,

Wendy

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