Photos: 10 Incredible Pictures of Polar Bears in the Wild

Maddi Higgins March 1, 2014 3

There is nothing quite like seeing polar bears in their natural habitat. These powerful “kings of the arctic” rule the unforgiving landscape of the North. We’ve compiled ten stunning photos that capture the true majesty of these wild predators.

The “Last Ice Area”—ice in the High Arctic of Canada and Greenland that scientists believe may persist longer than anywhere else—is 500,00 square miles

The “Last Ice Area”—ice in the High Arctic of Canada and Greenland that scientists believe may persist longer than anywhere else—is 500,00 square miles. Photo © Staffan Widstrand/WWF

Polar bears come ashore in the summer months when the ice recedes. Climate change is increasing the length of arctic summers. Photo (c) Eric Rock

Polar bears come ashore in the summer months when the ice recedes. Climate change is increasing the length of arctic summers. Photo © Eric Rock

Polar bears are social creatures and often communicate with their noses. Photo (c) Glen Delman

Polar bears are social creatures and often communicate with their noses. Photo © Glen Delman

Female polar bears usually give birth to two cubs. The cubs depend almost totally on their mothers for survival for at least the first 20 months. Photo (c) Michel Terrettaz/WWF-Canon

Female polar bears usually give birth to two cubs. The cubs depend almost totally on their mothers for survival for at least the first 20 months. Photo © Michel Terrettaz/WWF-Canon

Polar bears are accomplished swimmers; they can sustain a swimming pace of 6.2 miles per hour their fur is water resistant. Photo (c) Paul Nicklen/National Geographic/WWF-Canada

Polar bears are accomplished swimmers; they can sustain a swimming pace of 6.2 miles per hour. Their fur is water resistant. Photo © Paul Nicklen/National Geographic/WWF-Canada

Despite the harsh conditions of their environment, polar bears tend to overheat easily due to their fur’s incredibly efficient insulating properties. Photo (c) naturepl.com/Andy Rouse/WWF-Canon

Despite the harsh conditions of their environment, polar bears tend to overheat easily due to their fur’s incredibly efficient insulating properties. Photo © naturepl.com/Andy Rouse/WWF-Canon

Polar bear tracking allows WWF to receive regular updates about polar bears’ locations and how they may be affected by climate change. Photo (c) Melissa Scott

Polar bear tracking allows WWF to receive regular updates about polar bears’ locations and how they may be affected by climate change. Photo © Melissa Scott

Play fighting occurs between male bears to tune up hunting skills; fighting is aggressive when it occurs between males during breeding season or when attempting to steal food. Photo (c) Jeff A. Goldberg

Play fighting occurs between male bears to tune up hunting skills; fighting is aggressive when it occurs between males during breeding season or when attempting to steal food. Photo © Jeff A. Goldberg

Polar bears like to keep clean. After feeding, they will usually wash themselves by taking a swim in the sea or by rolling around in the loose snow. Photo (c) Patrick J. Endres

Polar bears like to keep clean. After feeding, they will usually wash themselves by taking a swim in the sea or by rolling around in the loose snow. Photo © Patrick J. Endres

The hair of a polar bear contains no pigment; the reflection of light gives the polar bears their white appearance. The skin underneath their fur is black. Photo (c) Tania Segura/WWF-US

The hair of a polar bear contains no pigment; the reflection of light gives the polar bears their white appearance. The skin underneath their fur is black. Photo © Tania Segura/WWF-US

See polar bears in the wild with WWF and Nat Hab.

3 Comments »

  1. ally March 5, 2014 at 8:32 pm - Reply

    polar bears r my favorite animals they r georgeous

  2. Linda May 4, 2014 at 11:07 am - Reply

    I love bears, and the Polar Bear is my favorite bear. I hope to get to Churchill in the Fall of 2014 or 2015

    • Emily Deemer May 6, 2014 at 11:21 am - Reply

      Hi Linda,
      So glad to hear that! If you need any help picking out one of our polar bear adventures, feel free to email us at info@nathab.com or call (800) 543-8917 and one of our Adventure Specialists will help you out. You can find all of our polar bear adventures here: http://www.nathab.com/polar-bear-tours/.

      Thanks!
      Emily

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